Prepostional Phrase

Many prepositional phrase seem adverbial in meaning, in that they often indicate time, place, manner, or degree as adverbs do. However, the same prepositional phrase may be used as an adjective, an adverb, or a noun.

The delegates went for a swim before breakfast. (adverb)

A swim before breakfast is better than one after dinner. (adjective)

Before breakfast is a good time to swim. (noun)

  • Prepositional phrase used as adverb usually follow the verb, though like adverbs, they can be moved to other positions in the sentence.
  • Preposition phrase used as adjectives usually follow the nouns they modified.
  • Preposition phrase used as nouns will be subjects, objects, or complements in the sentence.

Example…

Noun Phrase

Verb Phrase

Subject

Verb

Prepositional Phrase

Builders

They

They

. . . who

They

They

They

People

think

look

listen

talk

take

go

stop

depend

about the realities of particular settings.
at trade jouranals.
to those . . .
about fashion.
to ideas for combatting nature.
to great lengths.
at nothing.
on house plants for natural beauty.

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